Nematodes sprayed to save trees

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At 10.08 minutes:

Next year could see drones being used for the first time to drop microscopic worms on trees, to protect them from harmful insects. The worms, or nematodes, are natural predators of damaging insects and the forest industry is developing ways of controlling pests as pesticides it currently relies on are phased out. Without pesticides 40-100% of forest trees could die out, which could prove devastating to the forest industry. Oak processionary moths, pine weevils are two that are mentioned herein.

The Good Gardeners have Nematode technology. Our HH-2 system generates Nematodes in our waste management system that is effected in a soil treatment initiated at the time of planting stops so many predatory pests and diseases including slugs, snails and caterpillars. See our SHOP page.

1 thought on “Nematodes sprayed to save trees”

  1. Richard Higgins

    Roger Moore explains how 40-100% of transplanted trees can die from parasitic bugs so we spray them from drones with Nematodes.

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